Qualcomm unveils 5G NR royalty terms

first_img Mobile Mix: Buzzing for Barcelona Asia Telkomsel turns on 5G in major cities AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 28 NOV 2017 Diana is Mobile World Live’s US Editor, reporting on infrastructure and spectrum rollouts, regulatory issues, and other carrier news from the US market. Diana came to GSMA from her former role as Editor of Wireless Week and CED Magazine, digital-only… Read more Author Smartphone vendors will have to pay as much as $16.25 per device to use Qualcomm’s 5G New Radio (NR) technology under new royalty guidelines released by the company.Qualcomm said it will implement a royalty rate of 2.275 per cent of the selling price for single-mode 5G handsets and a higher rate of 3.25 per cent for multi-mode smartphones with 3G, 4G and 5G capabilities.So for a $200 multi-mode device, for instance, Qualcomm noted a vendor would have to pay $6.50 in royalties per device. Royalties are capped at a $500 device value, meaning the maximum amount a smartphone vendor would have to pay would be $16.25 per handset.The company added it will also offer access to its portfolio of both cellular standard essential patents and non-essential patents at a rate of 4 per cent of the selling price for single-mode devices and 5 per cent for multi-mode devices.Qualcomm’s rates are notably higher than those announced by Ericsson in March. The Swedish company said it would charge a flat royalty fee of $5 per 5G NR multimode handset, but noted its fee could go as low as $2.50 per device for handsets with low average selling prices.Patent woesQualcomm unveiled its 5G-ready X50 chipset in October 2016 and said it expects initial 5G handsets to become commercially available in 2019.The royalty rate announcement comes as Qualcomm continues to duke it out with Apple in a high profile dispute over the chipmaker’s patent licensing terms during which Apple accused Qualcomm of charging “at least five times more” than other licensing deals  in payments than all other cellular patent licensors we have agreements with combined”. Qualcomm denied allegations of unfair patent practices.The increasingly heated battle, though, has hit Qualcomm in the purse. In Q3, the chipmaker’s licensing revenue dropped 36 per cent year-on-year to $1.2 billion and for the full fiscal 2017 year fell 16 per cent to $6.45 billion. Relatedcenter_img Nokia scores Philippines 5G deal with Dito Previous ArticleFacebook expands AI tool to help prevent suicideNext ArticleFCC chair addresses net neutrality concerns Diana Goovaerts Home Qualcomm unveils 5G NR royalty terms Tags 5Gessential patentsQualcommlast_img read more

Coronavirus live updates: DHS warns of security risks posed by online learning

first_imgmrtom-uk/iStockBy WILLIAM MANSELL, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed nearly 200,000 people worldwide.More than 2.8 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 905,000 diagnosed cases and at least 51,949 deaths. Here’s how the news is developing Saturday. All times Eastern:10:37 a.m.: UK death toll surpasses 20,000The death toll in the United Kingdom has reached 20,319, according to the National Health Service (NHS). That number includes the 813 new daily deaths reported in the country.The country is now the fifth in the world to surpass 20,000 fatalities, behind the United States, Italy, Spain and France.The number of confirmed positive cases in the U.K. has reached 148,377, out of the 517,836 people who have been tested, according to the NHS.9:59 a.m.: DHS warns of ‘opportunity’ for criminal activity created by online learningThe Department of Homeland Security (DHS) warned officials in law enforcement and school systems of the security risks posed by cybercriminals and cyber-actors who might want to exploit what has become the new normal of online learning under COVID-19, according to the notice reviewed by ABC News.“We assess cybercriminals likely view schools’ greater reliance on eLearning tools due to the pandemic as an opportunity to conduct a range of criminal activity against educational institutions, faculty and students who use these tools,” the April 24 document says.The risks outlined include theft of login information, identify theft, the ability of cybercriminals to obtain discarded computers that still had cached data on their drives, extortion by using confidential student or employee data to blackmail either the educational institution or an individual, or denial-of-service attacks in exchange for ransom payments.The notice warned that the theft of login information could be used for either profit or by foreign governments, like Iran, to gain access to data they could not otherwise view. The theft of one’s identity could also be used for profit or by foreign governments like Russia, whose intelligence services have previously bought online ID info for spying and intel-gathering operations, according to the notice.Cyber experts at the DHS said that these threats are not hypothetical, every type of attack has been seen.They are warning employees who work on security and defense of IT systems to take proper precautions.6:33 a.m.: WHO warns against ‘immunity passports’In response to some governments suggesting that detection of COVID-19 antibodies could serve as the basis of an “immunity passport” that would allow people to travel or return to work assuming they are protected from contracting again or spreading the coronavirus, the World Health Organization issued a warning that said such a program is not backed up by scientific evidence.“There is currently no evidence that people who have recovered from COVID-19 and have antibodies are protected from a second infection,” the WHO said in a statement Friday.No study, as of April 24, has evaluated whether the presence of antibodies guarantees immunity to subsequent infection of COVID-19 in humans, the organization said.The WHO said people who have tested positive might be prone to ignore public health advice and “increase the risks of continued transmission” to other people.The warning comes as some states in the U.S. look to ease social distancing restrictions and to let some nonessential businesses reopen.States like Texas, Georgia, Oklahoma, while all taking a different approach, are now reopening businesses to jumpstart their economies. Georgia, despite criticism from President Donald Trump, will allow many businesses to reopen this week, including tattoo parlors, movie theaters, bowling alleys and more.5:20 a.m.: 138 inmates in Colorado prison test positiveAt least 138 inmates at the Sterling Correctional Facility in Colorado have tested positive for COVID-19, according to the Department of Corrections, and that number will likely rise soon.“Given the insidious nature of this virus, we had suspected that despite seeing a relatively low number of inmates with symptoms, the number of positives was potentially much higher,” Department of Corrections Executive Director Dean Williams said in a statement Friday. “That is exactly why we conducted this large scale testing, so that we can continue to isolate, monitor and treat any inmates who were positive and try to mitigate the spread to others inside the facility.”At least 473 symptomatic and asymptomatic inmates were tested for the novel coronavirus last week. Of those, only 255 results have been returned; 138 were positive, 104 were negative, 12 were inconclusive and one was unsatisfactory. The state is still waiting for the results of 218 inmate tests.Inside the prison, inmates are largely kept in their cells to help slow the spread of the virus, the state said. Outside of showering or using the restroom, they remain in their cells. All meals and medications are delivered to inmates during the quarantine.The facility previously had eight inmates that tested positive.Prisons across the U.S. are struggling to contain the spread of COVID-19 inside their walls. At the Rikers Island jail in New York City, 367 inmates have tested positive for the virus while 235 detainees in custody at Cook County Jail in Illinois are currently positive for COVID-19.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more