Canadian gets jail time in U.S. penny stock fraud case

first_img James Langton Related news Retail trading surge on regulators’ radar, Vingoe says The Canadian man who allegedly masterminded an international multimillion dollar boiler room stock scheme has been sentenced six and a half years in prison by a U.S. judge. The U.S. Department of Justice announced on Wednesday that Sandy Winick, 58, a Canadian who pled guilty last year to conspiring to commit wire fraud for running an international advance fee scheme, has been sentenced to serve 78 months in prison. He was also ordered to pay US$2.4 million in restitution and US$5 million in forfeiture. According to the indictment against him, and other court filings, Winick led two multi-million dollar fraud schemes, including an international “pump and dump” operation, and an advance fee scheme that targeted many of the victims in the first scam, which promised they would be able to sell their penny stocks. “Winick established and operated boiler rooms or call centers in various locations around the world, including Canada, Thailand, and China, to solicit fees from the victims,” U.S. authorities say, adding that he planned to open a call center in Brooklyn, N.Y. Winick was permanently banned and ordered to pay more than $1 million in fines and disgorgement by the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) in 2013. Canadian pleads guilty in U.S. penny stock fraud case Photo copyright: belchonock/123RF Keywords Fraud DoJ launches task force to tackle Covid-19 fraud Imposters among us, CSA warns Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Court rules in favour of labour-sponsored venture fund against fund manager Share this article and your comments with peers on social medialast_img read more

Offering advisor alpha to clients

first_img Best Practices To Evaluate and Trade ETFs – Insights from an ETF provider hand holding a megaphone samuraitop/123RF How ETF investors are unique — and why it matters to advisors “We have to […] scale not just our choice of securities, but our portfolio design and the way we balance portfolios,” said Westmacott, as well as cash management, client communication and financial planning. “All these wrap up to be the total client experience.”The problem is these things are susceptible to noise, or tracking error.Noise must be managed because clients want to know they’re receiving a similar level of service to other clients in similar situations, said Westmacott.For securities selection, using ETFs is a way to cut the noise, he said—specifically advisor tracking error. For example, he said advisors are affected by such things as when they last ate, whether they’re late for an important meeting or whether they had lunch with a favourite fund salesperson.Beyond security selection, cutting noise increasingly means relying on algorithms, he said, referencing a Harvard Business Review article. As formal rules, algorithms reduce the noise problem in decision making.“The high-level viewpoint here is not that ETFs are coming, but that algorithms are coming,” said Westmacott. Using algorithms effectively allows advisors to focus on client goals, he said.Westmacott also considered portfolio withdrawal rates, asking whether a standard withdrawal rate is the best that algorithms have to offer clients. As an alternative, he uses a dynamic spending rule (the technical term is ARVA), whereby the withdrawal rate varies based on portfolio value, mortality and real interest rates.The result: “You’re transferring some of the asset volatility to income volatility,” he said. “You’re asking the client to tolerate some variability in their annual income.”Clients buy in to the process, accepting ongoing guidance—on budgeting, for example — instead of focusing on products, he said. “A key part of this process is to shift the conversation from assets to income.”At the same time, advisors must be sensitive to changes in client circumstances that alter income needs. (To reduce income volatility, asset liability management can be employed using bond ETFs to match future liability — that is, income.)Using a client example, he showed how a variable withdrawal rate reduces the risk of having insufficient funds over a client’s retirement years and makes portfolio outcomes more predictable.For more on managing withdrawal risk, see Westmacott’s paper, “Management of Withdrawal Risk Through Optimal Life Cycle Asset Allocation” co-authoured with University of Waterloo academics. Keywords ETFs Facebook LinkedIn Twitter How ETFs fit into a hybrid advice model Related news Advisors who shift away from stock-picking must create value from a client perspective. How to do that was recently discussed by Graham Westmacott, a portfolio manager at PWL Capital in Waterloo, Ont. He spoke at the ETF Summit presented by Advisor’s Edge and Investment Executive last week.Westmacott said focusing on advisor alpha means meeting clients’ goals, not beating the market. To do that efficiently requires mass customization, which comes with its own challenges. ETF Summit agenda Why attend our ETF Summit Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Michelle Schriver last_img read more

Prof. Rex Nettleford’s Life Can Never Die – says PM Golding

first_imgRelatedProf. Rex Nettleford’s Life Can Never Die – says PM Golding FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Prime Minister the Hon. Bruce Golding says a great deal of Prof. Rex Nettleford’s life can never die. His work, Mr. Golding said includes the bridges he built to enable Jamaican’s minds to travel beyond self imposed boundaries, the confidence he inspired in Jamaicans, organisations he helped to build and his published works, writings and commentaries.Mr. Golding who was giving a tribute to Prof. Nettleford today (Feb 16) at the official service of thanksgiving at the University of the West Indies (UWI) Mona campus in Kingston, described the cultural icon as one of the most talented researchers, conceptualisers and artistes.Some of the organisations Prof. Nettleford helped to build are the National Dance Theatre Company, the Extra Mural department of the University of the West Indies which became the School of Continuing Studies, now the University’s fourth campus and the Trade Union Education Institute now renamed in honour of the late Hugh Lawson Shearer.PM Golding said these organisations “must now carry on his (Prof. Nettleford) work with the same zeal with which he helped to build them.”“The work and the legacy he has left us have helped to change our lives and enrich our existence and experience and provide us with a better understanding of how we must move forward as a people,” Mr. Golding said. RelatedProf. Rex Nettleford’s Life Can Never Die – says PM Golding RelatedProf. Rex Nettleford’s Life Can Never Die – says PM Goldingcenter_img Prof. Rex Nettleford’s Life Can Never Die – says PM Golding Office of the Prime MinisterFebruary 18, 2010 Advertisementslast_img read more

Marshall Government reaches for starts in new Space Sector Strategy

first_imgMarshall Government reaches for starts in new Space Sector Strategy The Marshall Liberal Government has launched South Australia’s Space Sector Strategy at the 10th Australian Space Forum.The new Strategy will aim to drive the state’s contribution to the Australian Space Agency goal of tripling the size of the nation’s domestic space industry to $12 billion by 2030, helping to create thousands of jobs.South Australia will focus its activities in space industry and research to propel the state’s growth in the sector and contribute to the national agenda.Launching the strategy, Premier Steven Marshall made it clear that South Australia’s space sector will be critical in the state’s economic recovery from the global coronavirus pandemic.“South Australia is unequivocally the home of space and this strategy sets a framework for South Australia to reach for the stars,” Premier Marshall said.“Businesses in the space sector will be creating thousands of job opportunities for South Australians over the next decade which is great for our economy.“Our vision for growth is simple – by 2030, South Australia will be designing, manufacturing, launching, and operating SmallSats (small satellites) to deliver actionable, space-derived intelligence for sovereign Australian missions – creating hundreds of jobs in the process.“Space is one of the nine sectors we have identified as a priority in our plan for further economic prosperity, helping to keep SA safe and strong and helping to create new jobs in this exciting sector.”“While the impact of the COIVD-19 pandemic has unequivocally affected the space sector, South Australia’s space sector growth target projects above average growth of 5.8% for the next ten years.The strategy was drafted in collaboration with industry and is a crucial part of South Australia’s broader Growth State Strategy, a partnership between the South Australian Government and industry to accelerate our economy through business expansion and innovation.Three pillars for growth shape efforts to build a thriving and enduring South Australian space ecosystem, dedicated to supporting the national strategy, cultivating South Australia as a centre-of-gravity for Australia’s expanding space activities, and capitalising on the opportunities of NewSpace.This means a focus on launch into accessible lower Earth orbits, machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) to exploit space-derived data, technological advances to develop small satellites, expanding a skilled workforce, and building on the state’s innovation ecosystem.South Australian Space Industry Centre (SASIC) Chief Executive Richard Price says the already thriving South Australia innovation ecosystem is already in take-off with the emergence of new and disruptive markets.“While traditional space-related services fundamentally underpin our way of life on Earth and deliver a large proportion of the revenue attributed to the space sector, there are phenomenal opportunities for the new breed of space-related services that are unencumbered by legacy practice,” he said.“These NewSpace-enabled products and services have strong potential to improve the productivity and competitiveness of virtually every sector of the broader economy, as well as making a direct contribution to growth in South Australia.”“We are committed to getting behind new entrants in the space industry and supporting domestic and international companies to develop and grow innovative and disruptive ideas contributing to our space sector.”South Australia is widely acknowledged as a hub of space innovation in Australia. The state is concentrated on building a world-class entrepreneurial community and supporting infrastructure for innovators to collaborate and grow their ideas at Lot Fourteen in Adelaide’s central business district.The South Australia Growth State Space Sector Strategy can be accessed in full at www.growthstate.sa.gov.au/sectors /Public News. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Adelaide, artificial intelligence, AusPol, Australia, Australian, Australian Government, building, community, coronavirus, Government, infrastructure, innovation, intelligence, machine learning, SA, SA Government, South Australia, space agencylast_img read more

Quality and Continuous Improvement – First Generation Magnox Storage Pond

first_imgQuality and Continuous Improvement – First Generation Magnox Storage Pond The use of continuous improvement has long been associated with manufacturing organisations such as car producers. This approach is fairly new to the NDA group businesses and one of the main reasons for not adopting it before now has been a lack of recognition that a manufacturing approach would be beneficial. What is helping gain traction is the realisation that each of our businesses needs to be able to deliver products, as do manufacturing companies, whether that is quantities of waste for interim storage or demolition of facilities and clean-up of land. There are significant benefits from applying these techniques.A collaborative approach to continuous improvement is being implemented across the NDA group. This has identified various levels of continuous improvement implementation, maturity and many different standards.In order to effectively manage implementation, experience from other sectors has helped define the priority improvement areas:ensuring that strategic objectives are cascaded at all levels in increasing detail throughout our businessesassociated performance targets are clearly defined and applied on a daily, weekly and monthly basisa strategy is embedded to align capability in order to address gaps identified between actual performance and targetsestablish an expectation to expose and close performance gaps at all levels, in all departments.Sellafield Limited has realigned itself to the approach described above, created a strategy, adopted a One NDA continuous improvement model, implemented a roadmap and created and started to deliver accredited industry good practice training to embed its strategy into the organisation. In addition, a baseline assessment tool to understand the maturity of continuous improvement across the organisation is now in use.A good practice approach within the First Generation Magnox Storage Pond (FGMSP) shows how continuous improvement can improve performance. The mission delivery outcome to retrieve all Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) from FGMSP by the required end date (SO31) has been cascaded through all levels of the team focussed on FGMSP using a range of appropriate measures and targets.What this means in FGMSP is that the objective of removing all the sludge and pond contents has been converted to a reduction in the metre cubed (m3) of contents per year to meet the currently planned completion date. Figure 14 shows the required annual sludge removal and the cumulative lifetime cost of doing so, which is used to track performance.The information on how much sludge has been removed can also be used to show the impact that more or less than planned sludge removal has on the estimated cost. In this example, each year the project is extended an additional sum of approximately £60 million would be needed showing how important it is to prevent timescales extending into the future.In cascading the decommissioning objective, the annual target is broken down into a weekly plan within which daily throughput (beat rate i.e. two sludge batches a day) is identified and incorporated in a Master Production Schedule. Linking the annual target number of sludge removed to achieve the m3 retrieval targets allows individuals to clearly understand how they contribute to mission delivery and become involved in solving any problems to achieve the throughput and then record any changes to the way they work in operations, maintenance, engineering, commercial or people issues within their Quality Management System (QMS).Visualisation and reviewing performance against targets not just for quantities of material but for safety, quality, cost and skills availability on a weekly basis allows gaps in performance to be exposed immediately and then closed by embedding improved capability in the workforce to problem solve systematically. Any learning can then be recorded and used in a continuously improving QMS.This approach is now accepted as good practice at all levels within FGMSP.Adopting this approach has contributed to 2019/20 delivery where all sludge targeted for removal was achieved against its most stretching target, increasing confidence that all of the sludge will be removed by 2026. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:car, Engineering, future, Government, Impact, industry, meet, production, project, quality, Safety, UK, UK Government, workforcelast_img read more

Lucea Cemetery to be cleaned on Labour Day

first_imgAdvertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The cleaning of the Lucea cemetery is the parish project for Hanover for Labour Day 2012 on May 23. The project was chosen at a multi-sectoral meeting held in the parish council chambers on May 2, which was chaired jointly by council chairman and Mayor of Lucea, Shernett Haughton, and Custos of the parish, Dr. David Stair. The representatives at the meeting agreed that the cemetery is in dire need of a facelift, and Labour Day provides the perfect opportunity to give focus to the facility. A technical team from the council will be visiting the cemetery to do an assessment of the work to be undertaken. Mayor Haughton and Secretary Manager of the council, Alfred Graham, committed to implementing a maintenance programme for the cemetery after it has been cleaned on Labour Day. The official launch of Labour Day activities is slated to take place on Monday May 7 at Jamaica House. The emphasis will be on cleaning up communities, towns, villages and the physical environment for the Jamaica 50 celebrations. The National Church Service is slated to take place on May 20 at the Calvary Baptist Church, Montego Bay. RelatedLucea Cemetery to be cleaned on Labour Day By Bryan Miller, JIS Reporter RelatedLucea Cemetery to be cleaned on Labour Day Lucea Cemetery to be cleaned on Labour Day CultureMay 7, 2012 RelatedLucea Cemetery to be cleaned on Labour Daylast_img read more

Nominations Invited for Civil Servant of the Year

first_imgRelatedGovernment to Address Workers’ Concerns During Upcoming Wage Negotiations Nominations are being invited from Ministries, Departments and Agencies of Government, for the 2014 Civil Servant of the Year.The award, now in its 11th year, recognises one civil servant deemed to have exhibited excellence in public service delivery, over the past year.Nomination forms should be completed by Permanent Secretaries and Heads of Departments and submitted along with a photograph and information on the candidate, to: Miss Erica Barnes, Civil Service Week Steering Committee, Ministry of Finance and Planning, Public Service Establishment Division, Employee Relations and Benefits Unit, 30 National Heroes Circle, Kingston 4, by Friday, August 29, 2014.A panel of judges, comprising persons within and outside the public sector, will select the winner after interviewing and evaluating all nominees.The winner will be required to undertake a small project to display the responsiveness of the Civil Service to social responsibility, and advancing its overall image, as well as serve on the Civil Service Week Steering Committee.In addition, the winner’s name will be inscribed on a plaque that will be displayed in the Office of the Prime Minister/Cabinet Office, and published in the media.The prestigious award was copped in 2013 by Jamaica Information Service (JIS) Director of Production, Enthrose Campbell.The Civil Servant of the Year Award forms part of activities for Civil Service Week 2014, to be celebrated from November 16 to 21, under the theme: ‘Public Sector Advancement through Partnership and Collaboration’.All nominees and the winner will be appropriately recognised at the official launch, scheduled for Friday, November 14.Additional information on this year’s competition is available from Ms. Barnes, who can be reached by telephone at 932-5380; fax – 932-5982; or email – [email protected] is also available at the Finance Ministry’s Employee Relations and Benefits Unit from – Marlene Mitchell at 932-5375 or [email protected], and Sylvia Shirley-Sterling at 932-5367 or [email protected] Nominations Invited for Civil Servant of the Year Finance & Public ServiceJuly 16, 2014Written by: Douglas McIntosh RelatedIMF Team to Conduct Review August Photo: Donald DelahayeCivil Servant of the Year 2013, Miss Enthrose Campbell, addressing a recent Empowerment Session for public sector employees, held under the theme: ‘Transformation and Renewal for a Better Tomorrow’, at the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ), in New Kingston. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail center_img Advertisements Nominations Invited for Civil Servant of the YearJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Story HighlightsNominations are being invited from Ministries, Departments and Agencies of Government, for the 2014 Civil Servant of the Year.The award, now in its 11th year, recognises one civil servant deemed to have exhibited excellencein public service delivery, over the past year.The prestigious award was copped in 2013 by Jamaica Information Service (JIS) Director of Production, Enthrose Campbell. RelatedEPOC Expresses Improved Confidence in Economylast_img read more

Kroes stirs up EU net neutrality debate

first_imgHomeBlog Kroes stirs up EU net neutrality debate Blog: Will Brexit see return of UK roaming fees? Tags EUNet Neutrality Previous ArticleHuawei wins M-Pesa upgrade contract in KenyaNext ArticleSprint slams latest Dish offer for Clearwire Author The editorial views expressed in this article are solely those of the author(s) and will not necessarily reflect the views of the GSMA, its Members or Associate Members. Blog: Is Title II really an investment killer? Related Ken Wieland Ken has been part of the MWC Mobile World Daily editorial team for the last three years, and is now contributing regularly to Mobile World Live. He has been a telecoms journalist for over 15 years, which includes eight…More Read more Blog AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 03 JUN 2013 EU roaming: a race to the bottom? NEW BLOG: In her most recent call for a single European telecoms market, Neelie Kroes, Europe’s digital commissioner, enthused about getting rid of premium roaming rates. Nothing new there, perhaps, but she also talked about “guaranteeing net neutrality”.It seems a big shift from her previous stance on the “open internet”, where the emphasis was on making operators’ traffic management policies more transparent.The prospect of EU-wide net neutrality legislation is sure to agitate operators fearful of so-called OTT competition. It will also raise the hackles of EU sovereign states that don’t take kindly to directives from Brussels. This is going to be hard for Kroes to pull off.It’s not yet clear how Europe’s digital chief intends to make her net neutrality guarantees, but a collision course has surely been set with many mobile and fixed-line operators, particularly those that have spent heavily on revamping their broadband access networks.Only days before Kroes was making her speech in Brussels, directed at the European Parliament, the European Telecommunications Network Operators’ Association (ETNO) – a lobby group for the region’s biggest telecom groups – was having its own meeting in Milan where the “digital single market” was discussed.ETNO’s subsequent statements hardly suggest that Kroes is going to have an easy net neutrality ride. While the lobby group acknowledges that investment in Europe is lagging behind other developed economies, ETNO lays only part of the blame on fragmented markets. Another contributory cause, it says, is an unpredictable and non-harmonised regulatory environment, which “still favours access seekers over investors”.Temperature’s risingNet neutrality never used to set pulses racing in Europe. If a network operator tried to stop customers from accessing rival services and content over the internet, or charged extra for them, it was seen as a self-defeating action. Competition in the region was so fierce, operators not toeing the net-neutrality line would surely lose out to those that did. Market forces, not regulatory intervention, seemed an effective guardian of the open internet.This is no longer the case. A growing number of European operators now claim the right to determine what services travel over their expensively-constructed broadband networks. And nor are they afraid to hit back against consumer lobby groups and regulators that say otherwise. The temperature of Europe’s net neutrality debate is rising.We saw this in the UK last year when the Broadband Stakeholder Group (BSG) – the government’s leading advisory agency on broadband – launched its Open Internet Code of Practice. Building on a previous initiative on transparency (giving customers easier access to information on operators’ traffic management practices) the new code cranked up net-neutrality pressure on operators.It may even provide a window on Kroes’ thinking about how net neutrality enforcement could work in practice.Signatories to the UK code mustn’t block any legal content or services, or make them difficult to access. If they do, they need to come clean on what restrictions are in place. And products that have restrictions cannot be marketed as providing “internet access”.True, many UK operators saw merit in the code. BT, BSkyB, O2, TalkTalk and Three UK were among the signatories (even though it was not compulsory).But others refused to sign, including EE (a joint venture between Deutsche Telekom and France Telecom), Virgin Media (a cable operator) and Vodafone.While these three companies say they support open internet principles – each signed up to the previous transparency initiative – they objected to dropping “internet access” from marketing materials. It suggested, of course, they already maintained service restrictions or had plans to introduce some.Net neutrality dissentThe UK is not an isolated European example of operator dissent to net neutrality. A report last year by Berec, a pan-European regulator advisory body, found that restrictions on internet services were fairly widespread. At least 20 per cent of mobile internet users in Europe experienced difficultly in accessing VoIP services, such as Skype, which deny voice-call revenue to operators. In countries where competition is not as great, Berec said this figure could exceed 90 per cent.Kroes, with her latest rallying cry, implies that reliance on greater transparency and market forces is not enough to “guarantee” net neutrality. She seems to prefer instead the legal clout to penalise operators if they block internet-based rivals. That will no doubt appeal to consumer groups as well.There is a precedent for net neutrality legislation in Europe. KPN, the biggest operator in the Netherlands, warned 3G customers in early 2011 that it would make them pay extra for using third-party messaging or VoIP applications. The announcement sparked a consumer backlash and net neutrality was written into the country’s telecommunications law a few months later.A pan-European agreement that guarantees net neutrality is unlikely to be implemented so swiftly. Instead, as in the US – where net neutrality is a much more hotly-contested topic, largely because competition is not as fierce – Europe seems headed for even greater friction between operators and regulators, perhaps even court battles. As network operators feel the growing financial strain of carrying rival internet services, it’s hard to imagine there won’t be some strong kicking back in Europe against net neutrality forces.Kroes has got her work cut out.last_img read more

Samsung mulls phoenix-like Galaxy Note 7 reboot

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 28 MAR 2017 KT makes LG Electronics trade-in move Realme pushes low-end 5G with Narzo Author Previous ArticleBharti Airtel sells stake in tower unit Infratel for $952MNext ArticleBlackBerry licensee TCL on the acquisition trail Home Samsung mulls phoenix-like Galaxy Note 7 reboot Saleha Riaz Saleha joined Mobile World Live in October 2014 as a reporter and works across all e-newsletters – creating content, writing blogs and reports as well as conducting feature interviews…More Read more center_img Samsung plans to sell refurbished versions of its Galaxy Note 7 smartphones, the model withdrawn in 2016 after problems with batteries caused some devices to overheat and catch fire.The company had been under pressure from environmental rights groups including Greenpeace to recycle returned Galaxy Note7 devices in an environmentally friendly way.In a statement Samsung said it would do this by first considering if devices could be used as refurbished or rental phones.“Regarding the Galaxy Note 7 devices as refurbished phones or rental phones, applicability is dependent upon consultations with regulatory authorities and carriers as well as due consideration of local demand. The markets and release dates will be determined accordingly,” it said.For remaining devices, it said components including semiconductors and camera modules would be detached and used for test sample production purposes, while precious metals such as copper, nickel, gold and silver would be extracted.Samsung’s announcement follows reports in February stating the tech giant is looking to offer a revamped version of the troubled device in some markets as a way of clearing inventory. Speculation around this increased when analysis from Samsung and independent researchers found no other problems in the device except the batteries.The news also comes just days before Samsung unveils its new Galaxy S8, its first major phone since the crisis.No doubt the South Korean vendor is under pressure and will hope the new device can reinvigorate the company, both in terms of sales and also its consumer reputation.Jude Lee, global senior campaigner at Greenpeace East Asia, said: “This is major win for everyone that took action, and a step towards shifting the way we produce and dispose of electronics.”However, Lee added: “While we welcome this news, Samsung must share as soon as possible more detailed timelines on when it will implement its promises, as well as how it intends to change its production system to make sure this never happens again.” Devices Galaxy Note 7Samsungsmartphone Smartphone shipments to ride 5G wave Tags Relatedlast_img read more

Altice USA names SVP for MVNO move

first_imgHome Altice USA names SVP for MVNO move MVNOs mount South Korea 5G pricing challenge AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 21 JUN 2018 Cable company Altice USA turned to the former deputy CEO and CFO of Altice Dominicana to head up a forthcoming MVNO service.Jean-Charles Nicolas (pictured) was named SVP of Altice Mobile, tasked with leading the development, launch and marketing strategy for the MVNO. He will report directly to Altice USA COO Hakim Boubazine.Nicolas holds more than 20 years experience in the mobile industry, including a stint with Neuf Cegetel, a France-based operator offering fixed and MVNO services.The move comes as Altice USA gears up to launch the new wireless offering through an MVNO agreement with Sprint. The deal offers a degree of reciprocity by enabling Sprint to access Altice USA’s cable infrastructure to boost its network densification efforts.In a statement, Boubazine called Altice USA’s expansion into the mobile market an “exciting evolution” which will enable it to “introduce disruptive and differentiating offers to our residential and business customers”. He added the company is making “great progress readying our network infrastructure and customer management platforms to support our mobile offering and are glad to have Jean-Charles on board for this next phase as we bring our wireless product to market”.Altice USA isn’t the only US cable company jumping into wireless.Comcast made the leap in May 2017 via an MVNO agreement with Verizon. Charter Communications, which similarly holds an agreement with Verizon, is preparing to follow in its footsteps. Altice USAMVNO Author Previous ArticleInstagram reels out long-form video appNext ArticleApple Pay moves into Poland and Norway Relatedcenter_img Optus enters MVNO market with Amaysim purchase Diana is Mobile World Live’s US Editor, reporting on infrastructure and spectrum rollouts, regulatory issues, and other carrier news from the US market. Diana came to GSMA from her former role as Editor of Wireless Week and CED Magazine, digital-only… Read more Diana Goovaerts Asia Tags T-Mobile chief issues MVNO warning to cable opslast_img read more