Endocannabinoid concentrations in human hair linked to severity of PTSD symptoms

first_imgShare LinkedIn Pinterest A study led by Sarah Wilker, of Ulm University, investigated this possibility by comparing patterns of endocannabinoid activity in survivors of the Ugandan civil war with that in healthy control participants who were not exposed to traumatic experiences. Hair samples were taken and chemically analyzed, because hair retains traces of endocannabinoid exposure that is more stable and reliable than that provided by a test of levels in the blood.Victims of trauma had significantly lower levels of endocannabinoid concentration in their hair samples than those who were not at risk of PTSD. More importantly, among those who had been exposed to trauma, there was a relationship between higher endocannabinoid concentration and lower symptomology related to PTSD.This suggests that low endocannabinoid activity may be consequence of traumatic experiences. That pattern of low activity in this key brain system may in turn contribute to the memory and stress symptoms associated with PTSD.The study authors conclude that there may be potential for developing drug therapy for sufferers of PTSD based on stimulation of the endocannabinoid system. Although this research remains several steps removed from suggesting any direct therapeutic benefits of marijuana use for PTSD, it would appear to be a potentially promising avenue for future study.One day, it may be possible to determine that the chemical compounds found in marijuana are well-suited to compensating for the deficits in brain chemical activity responsible for the most harmful effects of PTSD. Share on Facebookcenter_img Share on Twitter A class of chemicals in the brain related to those found naturally in marijuana may play a role in managing the symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), according to a study to be published in Psychoneuroendicrinology.The endocannabinoid system involves transmission and reception of a family of brain chemicals believed to be involved in a number of neural processes related to memory and stress regulation. Because this system is impacted by exposure to some of the key chemicals found in marijuana, conditions involving the endocannabinoid system may be good candidates for treatment with its use.PTSD is a growing public health concern in many societies, as risk of exposure increases due to events like war and terrorism, and as public knowledge of its impacts on victims and their families increases. Because the key problems associated with PTSD are related to memory (specifically, an inability to ignore intrusive traumatic memories) and stress, there has been speculation that the endocannabinoid system might be involved in the condition. Emaillast_img read more

Chinese, Canadian teams report more MCR-1 detections

first_imgTwo Chinese research teams reported more worrisome findings regarding the MCR-1 resistance gene alongside other resistance factors, hinting at the presence of bacteria strains that may resist all drugs, and Canadian researchers said they dected the MCR-1 gene in a British Columbia patient.The two reports from China were published yesterday by separate teams in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.The MCR-1 gene, first described by Chinese investigators in November, disables the last-line antibiotic colistin, an older drug that isn’t often used in humans but is commonly used for raising food animals.In one study, researchers examined a collection of 17 colistin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae samples collected from 2013 through 2015 at a hospital in Suzhou, China. They found the MCR-1 gene in four isolates, two Escherichia coli and two Klebsiella pneumonia.Tests revealed that the two K pneumonia samples were resistant to all nearly all drugs tested, and both carried the NDM-5 resistance gene, a variant of NDM-1 that has increased carbapenemase activity.The scientists concluded that MCR-1 has already established itself in highly resistant Enterobacteriaeae species, including into carbapenem-resistant strains that carry the NDM-5 gene.In the second study from China, the other team did further analysis of E coli isolates from retail meat samples that carried the MCR-1 gene to see if they were resistant to other antibiotics. They found that one E coli strain from a chicken wing purchased in a large supermarket in 2014, was resistant to all antibiotics sampled except for doxycycline and tigecycline.The strain co-produced NDM-9 and another resistance gene, FosA3, which they wrote was surprising and worrisome, given that carbapenem and fosfomycin aren’t approved for use in food animals in China and that the strain’s presence in retail meat could colonize the human intestinal tract where it could transfer resistance to other pathogens.Findings in British ColumbiaElsewhere, researchers from British Columbia confirmed MCR-1 resistance in a patient who returned to the province from China, according to a Jan 25 statement from the BC Centre for Disease Control (CDC).The report didn’t say when the isolate was collected, but it noted that the sample is the second human case of MCR-1 resistance detected in Canada. The patient was successfully treated and was discharged from the hospital.According to BC CDC, the risk to British Columbia is low, the MCR-1 gene is rare in Canada, and the source is likely animals and meat sold in China or healthcare exposures outside of Canada.See also:Jan 31 Lancet Infect Dis report on MCR-1 in carbapenem-resistant EnterobacteriaceaeJan 31 Lancet Infect Dis report on carbapenem- and colistin-resistant E colico-producing NDM-9 and MCR-1Jan 25 BC CDC statementlast_img read more

Hansom: Fantasia

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Is it fair to share the pain? Rectifying defects on a project

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

MACS in transatlantic service launch

first_imgThe 34,000 dwt open hatch box-shaped multipurpose container vessels, Amber Lagoon and Purple Beach, both of which are capable of lifting 110 tonnes, will be deployed in the service.The new service, which will initially be performed on a monthly basis, will accept breakbulk cargo, unitised cargo, rolling stock, steel products, project cargo, bulk parcels and containers.Amber Lagoon will execute the first eastbound sailing from the US Gulf, leaving Houston on January 5, 2015; while the first westbound voyage will begin loading in Bremen, Germany on January 30, 2015.The rotation of the service will be as follows: Altamira (Mexico), New Orleans, Houston, Rotterdam, Immingham, Bremen, Antwerp and Bilbao – however, MACS says that other ports en route in Europe and America will be served on demand.In Europe, Hamburg-based MACS will manage the service, while in the US and Mexico the new service will be represented by general agent, Galborg USA.  www.macship.comwww.galborg.comlast_img read more

Win tickets to Homemakers Expo

first_imgHomemakers Expo, a home improvement, décor, design and lifestyle exhibition, will be at the Cape Town International Convention Centre from Thursday September 15 until Sunday September 18. From Thursday to Saturday the show runs from 10am to 8pm and on Sunday, from 10am to 6pm. Entry is R80 for adults, R70 for pensioners and children under the age of 12 enter for free. Tickets are available at the door or through Webtickets.* Athlone News is giving away four family tickets (which each allow entry to six people) to the expo. All you have to do is send an SMS, with the keyword ANHome, your name, surname and email address to 34445 before 10pm on Sunday September 11. SMSes cost R1.50 each. Winners will be notified telephonically.last_img read more

Claims companies to pay £2.9m for ombudsman extension

first_imgThe Legal Ombudsman expects to receive 3,000 extra cases a year once it assumes responsibility for complaints about claims management companies, the Ministry of Justice has revealed.Handling these complaints will cost around £2.9m a year, on top of £800,000 to set up the scheme.The estimates appear in a consultation published by the MoJ yesterday seeking views on how the revamped system will work. It is expected that the ombudsman will handle complaints about CMCs from the end of this year.The MoJ said it had considered a number of options on the fee structure for CMCs, from charging the taxpayer to taking a flat fee from claims management companies. The final proposal is to charge complaints fees on a sliding scale of fees based on a company’s turnover.Under the proposals companies turning over between £75,000 and £163,636 will pay an annual fee of £540. Any companies with a higher revenue will pay a percentage of their takings, with fees capped at £40,000.Currently, firms with a turnover of less than £25,000 make up 40% of the industry: these companies will pay up to £250 in fees.The consultation document says: ‘Any other way of structuring the fee, including a flat fee, would not be justified in these circumstances as it would have a disproportionate effect on small and medium entities, potentially forcing some firms from the authorised market because the fees would be unaffordable.‘The extension of the ombudsman service has been promised by the government since August 2012 but has been delayed over concerns about funding.In 2013/14, the service dealt with around 69,000 contacts about law firms, of which 20,000 were complaints. Of these, 8,055 required an investigation.The Legal Ombudsman’s total operating expenditure for 2013/14 was £15.7m.The size of the claims management industry has decreased since the referral fee ban was introduced last April. The total number of CMCs dropped by more than 1,000 from a peak of 3,367 in 2011 to 2,254 in November 2013.The consultation closes on 6 June.last_img read more

Howard Kennedy and four solicitors taken to SDT

first_imgThe Solicitors Regulation Authority today confirmed it is prosecuting top-100 firm Howard Kennedy – and four individuals – for alleged breaches of accounts rules.The regulator alleges that the London firm committed breaches of the rules from 2009 to early 2015, and for the last three years of that period failed to put in place adequate measures to prevent rule breaches.The allegations are not related to the misappropriation or misapplication of client money, the SRA said. A further allegation is that from April 2012 the firm was aware that an employee had breached accounts rules but failed to report it until February 2015.In separate notices, the SRA confirms it is prosecuting the firm’s head of development and projects Mark Johnstone, partners Paul Amandini and Eric Gummers and Christopher Langford, former managing partner of City firm Amhurst Brown Colombotti before it merged with Howard Kennedy in 2003.Gummers is alleged to have committed accounts rules breaches between 2011 and 2014, and separate accounts rules breaches between 2011 and 2015 whilst acting in a second matter which concerned a family settlement of which he was a beneficiary.Langford faces three charges: accounts rules breaches between 2009 and 2012; separate breaches between 2012 and 2015 and thereby breaching three SRA principles; and from November 2013 rendering professional services to a client as a solicitor whilst also being the sole shareholder of a company which was receiving remuneration from that client for services rendered to him otherwise than in course of legal practice.Amandini is alleged to have breached accounts rules between 2011 and 2014, while Johnstone is charged with breaches dated from April 2014 to July 2014.The allegations are subject to a hearing before the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal and are as yet unproven. The firm declined to comment.last_img read more

Traxtion Group targets African rail market

first_imgAFRICA: The Sheltam group has been rebranded as Traxtion Group, following a 30% investment from Harith General Partners’ Pan African Infrastructure Development Fund 2.Traxtion Group aims to partner with locomotive and wagon manufacturers, track construction companies, consulting engineers and project developers in the African rail market. Chairman Brian Myerson said the business could also expand into the mining and industrial sectors.The newly launched Traxtion Leasing business will focus on product innovation and flexible financing, with maintenance support from Traxtion Sheltam. ‘Leasing companies need to be so much more than financiers, and at Traxtion Leasing we have the experience and understanding to bring product innovation to complement flexible funding solutions’, said Traxtion Leasing CEO Willem Goosen. ‘With the support of the outstanding maintenance expertise in Traxtion Sheltam it is a really exciting value proposition.’The Traxtion Projects business aims to combine Harith’s financing experience with the operational and freight market expertise of Traxtion Sheltam, to support operating concessions, upgrading projects and new infrastructure. ‘In addition to what this offering brings Africa, as a black-owned infrastructure fund we believe that Traxtion Leasing and Traxtion Projects are perfectly placed to support the South African government with its public-private partnership drive’, said Emile du Toit, Head of Pan African Infrastructure Development Fund 2.last_img read more

UNICEF urges Uganda to reduce child deaths

first_imgUNICEF says Uganda needs to double its efforts to reduce the deaths of children – especially those younger than five.Currently, of every thousand children born in the East African country, between 80 and 90 die before they turn five years old. The UN agency says Uganda needs to do more to ensure young children don’t die from preventable causes such as malaria or diarrhoea. Reducing the child mortality rate by 2030 is one of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.Isabel Nakirya reports.last_img read more